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E&WJR and SMJ - Locomotives and Rolling Stock

LMS Route: 'The Shakespeare Route'

Stratford on Avon Station (173) Stratford on Avon Shed (73) SMJ Locomotives and Rolling Stock (61)

The Early Years

by Simon Dunkley of 'The Erratic and Wandering Journey' - see www.ewjr.org

The locomotive history of the E&WJR is dependent on a lot of deduction, interpolation and extrapolation, although luckily this has been done already, mostly by Richard Allen who provided the information for the revised edition of JM Dunn’s Oakwood Press book. Dunn and Jordan tie up with historical sources, such as photographs and Beyer Peacock drawings, whereas Riley and Simpson have some deviations from these, but do provide other information such as liveries. Like a lot of minor railways, locomotives were ordered but could not be paid for as the costs of constructing the railway were woefully underestimated, and of course 'raising the necessary' was a perennial problem for the E&WJR. Be that as it may, there are some clear facts, and some slightly murkier facts which can be reported.

There is a photo of a small Manning Wardle loco arriving at Kineton, claimed to be of the first train. The engine concerned belonged to TR Crampton, the contractor and a shareholder of the railway. The locomotive seems to have popped up regularly, eventually being taken into stock cira 1895 and was the fourth and last engine to carry the No 1 running number – ironic considering it was the first to run. It was rebuilt about then, and reputedly withdrawn in 1908, and then sold on to become Morous under Colonel Stephen’s ownership. If it was withdrawn in 1908, the photo below can be dated as being no later than that year.

E&WJR Double Fairlie 0-6-0+0-6-0 locomotive originally built by the Yorkshire Engine Co for Mexican Railways
Ref: smjsa95
C Maggs
E&WJR Double Fairlie 0-6-0+0-6-0 locomotive originally built by the Yorkshire Engine Company
E&WJR Double Fairlie 0-6-0+0-6-0 locomotive originally built by the Yorkshire Engine Co for Mexican Railways
Ref: smj_misc365
Anon
Swindon Marlborough & Andover Railway Single Fairlie 0-4-4T of 1878 with Walschaert's valve gear
E&WJR Double Fairlie 0-6-0+0-6-0 locomotive originally built by the Yorkshire Engine Co for Mexican Railways
Ref: smjsa366
S Dunkley
Former E&WJR 0-6-0ST No 1 now seen in its Rother Vale Collieries guise as 'Rothervale' No 0
Former E&WJR 0-6-0ST No 1, now seen in Rother Vale Colliery livery and numbered 0, is in near original form
Ref: smjsa328
E Haigh
Former E&WJR 0-6-0ST No 1, now seen in Rother Vale Colliery livery and numbered 0, is in near original form

No 1 at Stratford, 1905-1908

To start the services in 1873, three 2-4-0 tank locomotives (No 4, No 5 and No 6) for passenger work and three 0-6-0 tender locomotives (No 1, No 2 and No 3) for freight work were ordered from Beyer Peacock of Manchester. These were completed in February 1873, but there is no evidence that they were actually delivered. In May 1875, they were purchased by the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway. Both were based on designs for Sewdish customers, the tanks being similar to Wroxall on the Isle of Wight Railway – these were in all probability stock designs for the period on the part of Beyer Peacock. Two old French locomotives, probably of the Buddicom/Allen/Crewe type were either hired or purchased from Thomas Brassey. 'Ceres' was a 2-4-0 and 'La Savoie' an 0-6-0. 'Ceres' was worn out by 1880 and scrapped at Stratford upon Avon, 'La Savoie' became a saddle tank and moved on to Birkenhead for Brassey, being sold 5 years later to the Bute Trustees and was finally scrapped in 1908 as Cardiff Railway No 22.

The next step was to hire locomotives from IW Boulton, amongst which was a George England 2-4-0 ex-Somerset & Dorset Junction Railway, and a couple of 0-6-0 saddle tanks. These were followed by the most extraordinary pair of engines: an 0-6-6-0T double Fairlie and an 0-4-4T single Fairlie, the latter albeit briefly and reputedly was the same as that which ran on the Swindon, Marlborough and Andover Railway. The 0-6-6-0T was the first locomotive used on a British railway to have Walschearts valve gear – it predated the 0-4-4T by two years – and was amongst the most powerful engines in the world at the time! It was built for use in Mexico, but the full order was not taken up. Finally, in 1879 the E&WJR was in a position to start buying new engines, and bought an 0-6-0ST from Beyer Peacock. It was put to work on the line from Stratford upon Avon to Broom, its low water capacity precluded its use anywhere else on the line. It was based on a design first supplied to the Crewe Coal and Iron Company, and was very similar to the London South Western Railway tank locomotives ascribed to Beattie. It was sold in 1890 to the Rother Vale Collieries Company, eventually passing into the hands of the National Coal Board, and was not scrapped until 1959 – bearing the number '0'. It is a shame that the preservation movement had not really got going at the time: it would have made an interesting historical item, and was the last E&WJR locomotive in steam by nearly 30 years!

To complete the early years there is 'Hope', the Yorkshire Engine Company 2-4-0T. This little locomotive had a lower water capacity than the saddle tank, which it replaced on the roster and became yet another No 1! It was used again between Stratford and Broom, and was sold on to the Cannock and Rugely Colliery via a dealer. It was rebuilt into an 0-6-0T in 1916, and – named Harrison – lasted until 1955 on the National Coal Board.

E&WJR 0-6-0ST No 1 is seen fresh out of the paint shop and looks resplendent in its 1907 lined chocolate livery
Ref: smjsa327
PW Robinson
E&WJR 0-6-0ST No 1 is seen fresh out of the paint shop and looks resplendent in its 1907 lined chocolate livery
E&WJR 2-4-0T No 1 standing at the head of a three coach local passenger train bound for Towcester
Ref: smjsa56
Real Photos
E&WJR 2-4-0T No 1 standing at the head of a three coach local passenger train bound for Towcester
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0ST No 1 built by Manning Wardle is seen at Stratford upon Avon near the SMJ General Manager's house
Ref: smjsa175
LCGB/K Nunn
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0ST No 1 built by Manning Wardle is seen at Stratford upon Avon near the General Manager's house
An oblique view of E&WJR 0-6-0ST No 1 and the GWR Clerestory Coach standing on the exchange line adjacent to the coal sidings
Ref: smjsa294
K Nunn
E&WJR 0-6-0ST No 1 and the GWR Clerestory Coach standing on the exchange line adjacent to the coal sidings
Another view of the small Manning Wardle locomotive which headed the E&WJR's first passenger services
Ref: smjsa293
K Nunn
Another view of the small Manning Wardle locomotive which headed the E&WJR's first passenger services

Close of showing E&WJR No 1, a Manning Wardle 0-6-ST, previously owned by contractors Crompton & Sons
Ref: smjsa55b
Anon
Close up showing E&WJR No 1, a Manning Wardle 0-6-ST, previously owned by contractors Crompton & Sons
Drawing of E&WJR's 2-4-0T built by the Yorkshire Engine Company to be used on the Broom to Stratford extension
Ref: smjsa367
S Dunkley
Drawing of E&WJR's 2-4-0T built by the Yorkshire Engine Company to be used on the Broom to Stratford extension

Number 2

When they could finally afford a new locomotive, what JM Dunn described as that hopeful band, 'the proprietors of, and other people interested in, the East and West Junction Railway' turned to Beyer Peacock of Manchester and ordered locomotives from their standard range. The first such locomotive, destined to be No 2 on the E&WJR and the SMJR (see below), was a design originally produced for a Dutch Railway, being an outside-framed 0-6-0 tender locomotive thought have 4 foot 6 inch driving wheels and cylinders of 17 inches bore x 24 inches stroke with Allen straight link motion. It was delivered with a round topped boiler, and square-with-round-corners windows. It was not fitted with continuous brakes and was obviously intended for hauling freight trains. According to Dick Riley and Bill Simpson, it was in brown, lined yellow-black-yellow in 1903, and was probably delivered in this colour scheme. In 1904 it was rebuilt, with a new cab and boiler and also vacuum brakes. The boiler was odd, being not quite a Belpaire: the vacuum brakes were fitted not to enable it to work passenger trains (the E&WJR was a Westinghouse air-braked line) but to provide extra coverage for through freight trains from the Midland Railway – the banana specials were vacuum braked. In this condition the locomotive survived to be absorbed into LMS stock as No 2300 and it lasted until 1926. It appears to have retained the black livery, lined green-yellow-green.

Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 2300, formerly SMJ No 2, is seen in Stratford on Avon goods yard marshalling goods wagons
Ref: smjsa46
WL Good
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 2300, formerly SMJ No 2, is seen in Stratford on Avon goods yard marshalling goods wagons
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 2300 stands resplendent in its new LMS livery as the locomotive crew change over on 8th April 1924
Ref: smjsa33
WL Good
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 2300 stands resplendent in its new LMS livery as the locomotive crew change over
E&WJR 0-6-0 No 2 is seen approaching Clifford Chambers after leaving Stratford on Avon station
Ref: smjsa32
LGRP
E&WJR 0-6-0 No 2 is seen approaching Clifford Chambers after leaving Stratford on Avon station
E&WJR 0-6-0 No 2 stands alongside a coal stack thought to be outside Stratford engine shed
Ref: smjsa368
PW Robinson
E&WJR 0-6-0 No 2 stands alongside a coal stack thought to be outside Stratford engine shed

Numbers 3 and 4

Following the apparent success of No 2, the E&WJR purchased two more six-coupled tender locomotives of a similar outline, but with wheels of 5 foot diameter, and altered dimensions. Locomotive No 3, like No 2 before it, was intended for freight traffic and was delivered without continuous brakes, but No 4 had the Westinghouse air brake fitted from new, suggesting it was intended for use on passenger trains. Locomotive No 4 served as the 'template' later on for locomotives No 10, No 11 and No 12. In 1904, No 3 was reboilered with a Belpaire firebox, which also involved a new cab spectacle plate and it was fitted with vacuum brakes. Both engines were put up for sale in 1908, and No 3 was put on the 'duplicate' list as No 03 until 1913, but despite this they both survived into LMS ownership as No 2301 and No 2302 (renumbered No 2397 in 1927). Locomotive No 2301 went in 1924, but No 2397 in 1929.

An early Edwardian view of E&WJR 0-6-0 No 3 posed alongside Stratford upon Avon shed's coal stack
Ref: smjsa369
S Dunkley
An early Edwardian view of E&WJR 0-6-0 No 3 posed alongside Stratford upon Avon shed's coal stack
A late Edwardian view of rebuilt E&WJR 0-6-0 No 3 posed alongside Stratford upon Avon shed's coal stack
Ref: smjsa334
CRH Simpson
A late Edwardian view of rebuilt E&WJR 0-6-0 No 3 posed alongside the shed's coal stack
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 4 is seen at Stratford on Avon station whilst at the head of a short passenger service to Towcester
Ref: smjsa54
PW Robinson
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 4 is seen at Stratford on Avon station at the head of a passenger service to Towcester

Numbers 5 and 6

With the recommencement of passenger services between Stratford and Blisworth in 1884, the E&WJR found itself in need of suitable locomotives to haul the trains. It turned again to Beyer, Peacock who just happened to have two tank locomotives immediately available! The Swindon, Marlborough and Andover Railway had ordered three 2-4-0T tanks locomotives to be No 8, No 9 and No 10, but could only afford one of them: 9 and 10 remained in Manchester, but not before 'No 10' was the subject of a maker's photograph, which has led to much historical confusion! Let's be clear and honest about these locomotives: they were not ideal for the railway, having a large overhang at the rear which made them unsteady when running in reverse on the indifferent E&WJR permanent way. More tender locomotives would probably have been preferable. Beyer Peacock twice (1894 and 1906) drew up plans for converting them to 2-4-2 tank locomotives, a scheme which was never followed but sounds interesting. However they gave steady service for nearly 30 years. As it was, bunker first running was only permitted in an emergency, and not at all between Broom and Stratford!

Apart from the numbers, the locomotives were identical – which is pretty much a record on the E&WJR prior to 1895 – having 5 foot 6 inch drivers and cylinders matching those in No 2, No 3 and No 4, of 17 inch bore and 24 inch stroke. As delivered they had large spectacles on the cab front and an ornate dome, looking rather attractive to my admittedly biased eye, but in the early 1900s, a new cab spectacle plate was fitted with smaller windows, but the dome and safety valves were retained. When new boilers were required in 1907 after an unsuccessful attempt to sell the pair and to replace them with new stock, the safety valves were changed and a plain dome was fitted. Eventually, the pair were sold to the War Department in 1916 (despite being listed as withdrawn in 1917 and 1913 respectively!) and went to Catterick Camp as Military Camp Railway No 94 (No 5) and Longmoor Camp as MCR No 95 (No 6). The latter was listed as for sale as late as 1921, but apart from a rumour that one of them ended up in China (!) there is no record of their final fate.

E&WJR 2-4-0T No 5 is standing in the station with a three coach service ready to depart for Broom Junction on 20th April 1897
Ref: smjsa167
SWA Newton
E&WJR 2-4-0T No 5 is stands with a three coach service ready to depart for Broom Junction on 20th April 1897
Ex-E&WJR 2-4-0T No 5, in its SMJ livery, standing on the road outside Stratford upon Avon shed
Ref: smjsa239
Locomotive Publishing
Ex-E&WJR 2-4-0T No 5, in its SMJ livery, standing on the road outside Stratford upon Avon shed
E&WJR 2-4-0T No 5 pauses with a eight-coach special train at the east end of the up platform to top up the tanks with water
Ref: smjsa279
Locomotive Publishing
E&WJR 2-4-0T No 5 pauses with a special train at the east end of the up platform to top up the tanks with water
SMJ Goods brake van No 31  one of ten such vehicles known to be in service in January 1916
Ref: smjsa370
S Dunkley
E&WJR 2-4-0T No 5, now fitted with a new cab, is standing adjacent to the garden sidings circa 1900-1907
SMJ 2-4-0 No 5, one of the locomotives from the E&WJR days, is seen standing outside the shed with the cattle dock behind
Ref: smjsa335
Locomotive Publishing
SMJ 2-4-0 No 5, one of the locomotives from the E&WJR days, is seen standing outside the shed

Ex-E&WJR 2-4-0 No 6 standing the original station whilst at the head of a service for Towcester
Ref: smjsa52
Real Photos
Ex-E&WJR 2-4-0 No 6 standing the original station whilst at the head of a service for Towcester
Ex-E&WJR 2-4-0T No 6, resplendent in its SMJ livery, stands gleaming in the sun at the head of a Towcester train circa 1909-10
Ref: smjsa52b
Real Photos
Ex-E&WJR 2-4-0T No 6, resplendent in its SMJ livery, stands gleaming in the sun at the head of a Towcester train
E&WJR 2-4-0T No 6 stands outside Stratford upon Avon shed prior to being reboilered in 1907-8
Ref: smjsa348
Locomotive Publishing
E&WJR 2-4-0T No 6 stands outside Stratford upon Avon shed prior to being reboilered in 1907-8

Numbers 7 to 9

With the opening of the through route to the Midland Railway at Olney, between Northampton and Bedford, via the Easton Neston Minerals, Towcester, Roade and Olney Junction Railway (yes, really!) the E&WJR was able to offer the facility to the Midland of a short cut for freight traffic from Bristol docks to London. This was particularly useful for the perishable traffic of bananas. Trains arrived from Bristol at Broom Junction, where they were reversed over the E&WJR. Initially Midland locomotives were used, but they were too heavy for the track and the East and West needed to provide its own power. However, the banana trains used stock fitted with the automatic vacuum brake, and the E&WJR had no suitable locomotives. An approach was made to the LNWR, who were selling some of their famed DX goods locomotives, and three were bought at the end of 1892. One, LNWR No 1891 (formerly No 648 until 1887), had the vacuum brake fitted and was therefore technically an SDX – S standing for 'special': it became E&WJR No 7 . The other two, LNWR No 1945 (No 809 until 1889) and No 1966 (No 825 until 1890) were not fitted with power brakes, and became general freight locomotives No 8 and No 9. The working timetables had three paths allocated for banana trains, but the existence of the vacuum brake on No 7 only suggests that at first, only one train ran this way. The DX goods locomotives bought had been fitted with new fireboxes and boilers under Webb, but these three appear to have had them built to the Ramsbottom pattern and dimensions (shorter firebox, larger boiler at a lower pitch – modellers beware!) which also had a top hinged smokebox door. It is somehow typical of the E&WJR that they managed to buy three examples of one of the most numerous and famously standardised locomotive classes built in the UK, and all three were different!

One of the last two locomotives was fitted with cast-iron wheels with 12 spokes of H-section instead of the usual 15 spoke variety. This was fairly uncommon, and they were nick-named as 'duckfoot DXs'. Locomotives No 7 and No 8 had been rebuilt by the LNWR in 1878 and 1880 respectively, but No 9 was not rebuilt, suggesting (to me, at least!) that it was No 9 which was the Duckfoot locomotive as delivered. In 1903, No 8 was reported as having worn out wheels, and No 9 as being worn out apart from the wheels, so the obvious solution was to put the wheels from No 9 under No 8. Although I have been able to track down a photo of No 8 with duckfoot wheels, I do not have the date, so whether this is after the swap, or before it, I do not know for sure but I suspect the latter as the locomotive has acquired brakes on the locomotive, not just the tender, and appears to have had a vacuum ejector fitted – something not, so far, documented elsewhere, and which I surmise was added when it was rebuilt. This suggests that No 8 had some substantial work carried out in 1903, to make one working locomotive out of two that were getting worn. Despite this, it was listed as 'recently withdrawn' in 1908. As a modeller, I can choose which version suits me until I find out more, and even then it will require nothing more than a renumbering if I have things wrong as the locomotives were otherwise identical. Locomotive No 7 was placed onto the duplicate list in 1908, renumbered as No 07, and scheduled for scrapping but No 10 was in a worse state and No 7 was renovated and fitted with a new boiler of standard Webb pattern from the LNWR in 1914 and taken back into capital stock as No 7, lasting until 1920.

Ex-LNWR 0-6-0 DX Goods, now allocated SMJ No 7, is heading a Class 5 express goods at Woodford West in 1915
Ref: smjsa94
LCGB/K Nunn
Ex-LNWR 0-6-0 DX Goods, now allocated SMJ No 7, is heading a Class 5 express goods at Woodford West
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 7, now in SMJ ownership, with Beyer Peacock tender is seen stabled fully coaled and watered outside the shed
Ref: smjsa51
RS Carpenter
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 7, now in SMJ ownership, is seen stabled fully coaled and watered outside the shed
E&WJR 0-6-0 No 7, a former LNWR 'DX Goods' locomotive, with a tool van in tow outside the shed
Ref: smjsa347
Locomotive Publishing
E&WJR 0-6-0 No 7, a former LNWR 'DX Goods' locomotive, with a tool van in tow outside the shed
E&WJR 0-6-0 No 8, a former LNWR 'DX Goods' locomotive, stands alongside the coal stack at Stratford upon Avon shed
Ref: smjsa346
RC Riley
E&WJR 0-6-0 No 8, a former LNWR 'DX Goods' locomotive, stands next to the coal stack at Stratford upon Avon shed
Two former LNWR 0-6-0 'DX Goods' locomotives, E&WJR No 8 on the left and E&WJR No 9 on the right
Ref: smjsa382
RC Riley
Two ex-LNWR 0-6-0 'DX Goods' locomotives, E&WJR No 8 on the left and E&WJR No 9 on the right

The second No 7

Finding itself short of reliable motive power and in need of an 0-6-0, the SMJR made the dubious purchase of an engine from the London Brighton South Coast Railway. Dubious, as despite being 36 years old with over 750,000 miles on the book, it cost £3,000 (expensive even allowing for wartime inflation) and it had no injectors, requiring movement to power the axle driven pump to put water into the boiler. On a line such as the SMJR, with a sedate if not leisurely progress this was not a good idea and the purchase was not popular with the crews. The engine lasted under the LMS until November 1924, carrying the allotted No 2303 and a Midland chimney!

SMJ 0-6-0 No 7, a former London Brighton & South Coast Railway C1 class locomotive
Ref: smjsa301
Real Photographs
SMJ 0-6-0 No 7, formerly London Brighton & South Coast Railway C1 class locomotive No 428
SMJ 0-6-0 No 7, an ex-LBSCR  locomotive purchased by the SMJ in 1920, seen standing outside the shed
Ref: smjsa31
Real Photos
SMJ 0-6-0 No 7, an ex-LBSCR locomotive purchased by the SMJ in 1920, seen standing outside the shed
Ex-LBSCR 0-6-0 Stroudley 'C1' class, now  LMS No 2303, running wrong road in Stratford on Avon goods yard
Ref: smjsa34
WL Good
Ex-LBSCR 0-6-0 Stroudley 'C1' class, now LMS No 2303, running wrong road in Stratford on Avon goods yard
Another view of SMJ 0-6-0 No 7, fully coaled and watered, standing outside the original E&WJR shed
Ref: smjsa336
Locomotive Publishing
Another view of SMJ 0-6-0 No 7, fully coaled and watered, standing outside the original E&WJR shed
Ex-LBSCR 0-6-0 C1 stands on one of the roads outside Stratford upon Avon's original shed circa 1921
Ref: smjsa371
S Dunkley
Ex-LBSCR 0-6-0 C1 stands on one of the roads outside Stratford upon Avon's original shed circa 1921

Numbers 10 to 12

In 1895, the E&WJR was in a position to order a new 0-6-0 locomotive from Beyer Peacock and returned to the successful pattern of No 4, albeit now fitted with the automatic vacuum brake as well as the Westinghouse airbrake (all of the railways which connected to the E&WJR used the automatic vacuum brake). The new locomotive became No 10, and interestingly had a number plate which included a statement of ownership. Two more locomotives, No 11 and No 12, followed in 1896 and 1900 respectively. The boiler barrels were slightly shorter and had fewer tubes, the wheels had thicker tyres, but apart from the vacuum ejector and pipes, the trio looked the same as No 4. This is the first real degree of standardisation seen on the E&WJR; once No 4 was dual fitted later on in its life, there were four all but identical locomotives in operation. Indications are that they were delivered in crimson lake lined as per the Midland Railway, and repainted into standard SMJR black upon the merger, or in the years leading up to it.

Locomotive No 10 must have seen some heavy use, as it was laid aside in 1914, but the money raised from the sale of No 5 and No 6 meant that a new boiler, cylinders and wheels could be purchased – under wartime government control of the railways, a new locomotive was unlikely to be forthcoming. Locomotive No 10 returned to traffic in 1917, having been omitted from the stock returns for the previous three years. Under the LMS, they were allocated No 2304, No 2305 and No 2036, No 11 being the first SMJR engine to be renumbered (September 1923) during an overhaul at Derby when slight modifications were made to allow for the fitting of standard MR parts where possible. Locomotive No 10 was condemned in April 1924 (must have been a popular locomotive and worked into the ground!) without receiving its LMS number, and provided spare parts for locomotives No 2, 3, 4, 11 and 12. Locomotive No 11 and No 12, as LMS No 2305 and No 2306, were renumbered as No 2398 and No 2399 in 1927, and both lasted until 1930.

E&WJR 0-6-0 No 10 stands in glorious sunshine in during shunting duties in Stratford upon Avon's goods yard
Ref: smjsa337
Locomotive Publishing
E&WJR 0-6-0 No 10 stands in glorious sunshine in during shunting duties in Stratford upon Avon's goods yard
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 11 is seen in its SMJ livery standing on the back road behind Stratford on Avon shed
Ref: smjsa68
Real Photos
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 11 is in its SMJ livery standing on the back road behind Stratford on Avon shed
E&WJR 0-6-0 No 11 looks resplendent when adjacent to coal stack at Stratford upon Avon shed
Ref: smjsa345
PW Robinson
E&WJR 0-6-0 No 11 looks resplendent when adjacent to coal stack at Stratford upon Avon shed
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 2306, formerly E&WJR No 12 but now in its LMS guise, is busy working within the confines of Stratford station
Ref: smjsa234
NJ Allcock
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 2306, formerly E&WJR No 12 is busy working within the confines of Stratford station
E&WJR 0-6-0 No 12 with 'outside frames' is stabled fully serviced outside Stratford upon Avon shed
Ref: smjsa338
Locomotive Publishing
E&WJR 0-6-0 No 12 with 'outside frames' is stabled fully serviced outside Stratford upon Avon shed

Number 13

In 1903, the E&WJR took delivery of a new locomotive for 'express passenger' work, a 2-4-0 with 6 foot driving wheels and a very pleasing outline. Despite the 2-4-0T locomotives already in service and the 0-6-0s locomotives No 10, No 11 and No 12 being delivered in lined red, this engine arrived in blue! It was, by all accounts, the most free-running locomotive the railway had, and popular with the men, but truth be told the 0-6-0s were perfectly capable of handling all of the traffic and far more versatile, so it became a singleton and was not repeated. The design was basically that by William Kirtley for the Hull and Barnsley (itself derived from LCDR practice) fitted with a Belpaire boiler: no general arrangement was produced for the alterations. It introduced Stephenson link motion to the railway. Only two more 2-4-0s were built for a British railway company after this, both for the North Staffordshire Railway: the E&WJR even managed to miss out on being last at something! Although allocated LMS No 290, No 13 was withdrawn due to its boiler condition in 1924 without being renumbered: the valve gear and cylinders were suitable as spares for locomotives No 14, No 15 and No 16.

E&WJR 2-4-0 No 13 with a two coach train, waits at Straford upon Avon in East & West Junction Railway days
Ref: smjsa300
Locomotive Publishing
E&WJR 2-4-0 No 13 with a two coach train, waits at Straford upon Avon in East & West Junction Railway days
Close up showing the remains of the station's cattle dock and some of the goods yard buildings
Ref: smjsa344
CRH Simpson
E&WJR 2-4-0 No 13 a handsome locomotive with its proportions its dark blue livery which was new to the railway
E&WJR 2-4-0 No 13 is seen standing on the original turntable outside Stratford upon Avon shed
Ref: smjsa377
S Dunkley
E&WJR 2-4-0 No 13 is seen standing on the original turntable outside Stratford upon Avon shed
SMJ Goods brake van No 31  one of ten such vehicles known to be in service in January 1916
Ref: smjsa373
Postcard
Ex-E&WJR 2-4-0 No 13, seen in its SMJ livery, poses for a 'Frank Moore' postcard photograph

Numbers 14-16

Being in a position to order more motive power, the E&WJR again returned to Beyer Peacock for outside framed 0-6-0s in 1903, 1905 and 1906. The engines delivered were an updated version of those which went before, but with Belpaire fireboxes, straight footplates and 4 foot 9 inch wheels. Following on from No 13, these were also delivered in blue. Cylinders and motion were the same as for the 2-4-0, as was for the most part the boiler and firebox. These locomotives were not fitted with air brakes, being vacuum only, and allowed the displacement of the DX goods on through goods trains: at least on paper. (I suspect that No 10, No 11 and No 12 had already taken a share of this!). Locomotive No 16 ran for nine years from 1910 with Isaacson valve gear (see locomotives No 17 and No 18) but was returned to Stephenson's link four years before the Grouping. All three passed to the LMS, being allocated 2307-9, and lasted until 1926, 1924 and 1926 respectively. Although there is no photographic proof (yet!) that 15 was renumbered, it was quoted as No 2308 in LMS instructions from October 1923: No 10 and No 13 were not so quoted. The photographs of No 14 (in image 'smjsa374') and No 15 (in image 'smjsa375') are from my collection and were taken on the same day in 1922 by an unknown photographer, and fortunately from opposite sides.

An official works photograph of E&WJR 0-6-0 No 14 prior to it being delivered to the railway
Ref: smjsa339
Locomotive Publishing
An official works photograph of E&WJR 0-6-0 No 14 prior to it being delivered to the railway
E&WJR 0-6-0 No 14 stands 'wrong road' on the up platform carrying Class 6 headlamps
Ref: smjsa374
S Dunkley
E&WJR 0-6-0 No 14 stands 'wrong road' on the up platform carrying Class 6 headlamps
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 15, stands outside the shed carrying Class 2 headlamps in 1922
Ref: smjsa375
S Dunkley
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 15, stands outside the shed carrying Class 2 headlamps in 1922
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 15, now in SMJ livery, stands immaculate in its livery with polished buffers at the head of a short goods train
Ref: smjsa53
Lens of Sutton
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 15, now in SMJ livery, stands with polished buffers at the head of a short goods train
Close up of ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 15 pausing for the driver to dismount at Stratford on Avon station's up platform
Ref: smjsa53b
Anon
Close up of ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 15 pausing for the driver to dismount at Stratford on Avon station's up platform

View of Stratford on Avon shed with SMJ 0-6-0 No 15 and ex-E&WJR Manning Wardle 0-6-0ST No 1
Ref: smjsa55
Anon
View of Stratford on Avon shed with SMJ 0-6-0 No 15 and ex-E&WJR Manning Wardle 0-6-0ST No 1
View of the front of SMJ 0-6-0 No 15 as it stands on one of the roads outside the shed on 11th April 1924
Ref: smjsa74
WL Good
View of the front of SMJ 0-6-0 No 15 as it stands on one of the roads outside the shed on 11th April 1924
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 15 is seen taking on water outside Stratford upon Avon's shed on a winters day
Ref: smjsa343
RJ Essery
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 15 is seen taking on water outside Stratford upon Avon's shed on a winters day
Close up showing the remains of the station's cattle dock and some of the goods yard buildings
Ref: smjsa340
RJ Essery
E&WJR 0-6-0 No 16, in E&WJR livery, stands resplendent on Stratford upon Avon shed's turntable prior to 1909
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 16 leaves the station on 11th April 1924 with a two coach passenger train for Broom Junction
Ref: smjsa50
WL Good
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 16 leaves the station on with a two coach passenger train for Broom Junction

LMS 0-6-0 No 2309, formerly E&WJR No 16, passes Stratford on Avon's new signal box on 20th February 1925
Ref: smjsa35
WL Good
LMS 0-6-0 No 2309, formerly E&WJR No 16, passes Stratford on Avon's new signal box on 20th February 1925
SMJ 0-6-0 No 2311, formerly SMJ No 16, seen stabled on the roads in front of Stratford on Avon shed
Ref: smjsa79
WL Good
SMJ 0-6-0 No 2311, formerly SMJ No 16, seen stabled on the roads in front of Stratford on Avon shed

Numbers 17 and 18

The last two new locomotives ordered by the E&WJR caused a little embarrassment, as the E&WJR found itself unable to pay for them! However, the financial reconstruction of the E&WJR in 1908 to incorporate the Evesham, Redditch and Stratford-upon-Avon Junction Railway and the Stratford-upon-Avon, Towcester and Midland Junction Railway (all three companies were predominantly owned by the same people) into a new company called the Stratford and Midland Junction Railway enabled the SMJR to pay in full in January 1909, and the locomotives entered straight into SMJR stock. They were similar to No 14, No 15 and No 16, but differed in having Isaacson’s valve gear, larger cylinders and a larger boiler – thus denying the SMJR the benefits of 5 locomotives of identical design! Not only that, but there was trouble with the valve gear initially, but after attention from the makers, it was possible to claim a 15% saving of coal. They were delivered in the new livery of black, lined yellow-green-yellow. Both engines lasted into LMS days, being withdrawn in 1925 as 2310 and 1927 as 2311 respectively. Locomotive No 18 was photographed by the LMS at Saltney, along with No 13, and appeared on a Frank Moore postcard: locomotive No 18 and locomotive No 13.

Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 17 is seen on 11th April 1924 bringing a goods train through the station 'wrong road'
Ref: smjsa48
WL Good
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 17 is seen on 11th April 1924 bringing a goods train through the station 'wrong road'
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 17 draws forward from the siding which ran alongside the shed on 16th September 1922
Ref: smjsa342
Real Photographs
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 17 draws forward from the siding which ran alongside the shed on 16th September 1922
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 18, now in SMJ guise heads a special train of GCR stock conveying the American Ambassador
Ref: smjsa67
Lens of Sutton
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 18, now in SMJ guise heads a special train of GCR stock conveying the American Ambassador
SMJ 0-6-0 No 18 stands outside the shed after working forward the US Ambassador's special from Woodford Halse
Ref: smjsa163
Anon
SMJ 0-6-0 No 18 stands outside the shed after working forward the US Ambassador's special from Woodford Halse
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 18 now carrying SMJ livery, stands opposite Stratford upon Avon's goods yard
Ref: smjsa341
Real Photographs
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 18 now carrying SMJ livery, stands opposite Stratford upon Avon's goods yard

Ex-SMJ 0-6-0 No 2311 formerly SMJ No 18 is seen standing on the repositioned turntable on 8th April 1924
Ref: smjsa69
WL Good
Ex-SMJ 0-6-0 No 2311 formerly SMJ No 18 is seen standing on the repositioned turntable on 8th April 1924
Another view of ex-SMJ 0-6-0 No 2311 formerly SMJ No 18 on the turntable at the shed 8th April 1924
Ref: smjsa70
WL Good
Another view of ex-SMJ 0-6-0 No 2311 formerly SMJ No 18 on the turntable at the shed 8th April 1924
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 18, now in SMJ livery, is seen coming off shed ready for its next turn of duty
Ref: smjsa378
Real Photographs
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 18, now in SMJ livery, is seen coming off shed ready for its next turn of duty
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 18 Frank Moore postcard, seen in its SMJ livery, poses for a 'Frank Moore' postcard photograph
Ref: smjsa376
Postcard
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 18 Frank Moore postcard, seen in its SMJ livery, poses for a 'Frank Moore' postcard photograph
View of ex-SMJ 0-6-0 No 2311, formerly SMJ No 18, standing on No 4 road outside the shed on 8th April 1924
Ref: smjsa78
WL Good
View of ex-SMJ 0-6-0 No 2311, formerly SMJ No 18, standing on No 4 road outside the shed on 8th April 1924

SMJ 0-6-0 No 18 is seen on 11th April 1924 heading a goods train through the station past the up platform
Ref: smjsa49
LGRP
Ex-E&WJR 0-6-0 No 18 is seen heading a goods train through the station past the up platform

E&WJR & SMJ Goods Vehicles, Coaches and Passenger Rated Rolling stock

Much of the information and or photographs provided on this and other linked pages has been derived from books written by: Arthur Jordon The Stratford upon Avon and Midland Junction Railway published by OPC; JM Dunn's The Stratford upon Avon & Midland Junction Railway published by The Oakwood Press; RC Riley and Bill Simpson in their book A History of the Stratford-Upon-Avon and Midland Junction Railway published by Lamplight Publications; David Blasgrove in his book 'Warwickshire's Lost Railways' published by Stenlake Publishing which has a brief illustrated overview of some of the stations; and finally Geoffrey Kingscott's Lost Railways of Warwickshire published by Countryside Books which has a section dedicated to the SMJR with 'Now and Then' photographs. We would like to express our thanks to the members of the SMJ Society (www.smj.me) for use of their information and images, in particular the late John Jennings whose contribution can be seen on many of our SMJ pages.

Thought to be the first coach operated by the E&WJR, No 4, is now Director's Inspection Saloon No 01
Ref: smjsa287
Locomotive Publishing
Thought to be the first coach operated by the E&WJR, No 4, is now Director's Inspection Saloon No 01
A typical six-wheel Stratford & Midland Junction Railway First Class / Third Class composite coach
Ref: smjsa329
RJ Essery
A typical six-wheel Stratford & Midland Junction Railway First Class / Third Class composite coach
Close up showing the coaching stock in pre-1909 livery of crimson lake below the waist and cream above
Ref: smjsa56a
Real Photos
Close up showing the coaching stock in pre-1909 livery of crimson lake below the waist and cream above
Close up showing the two rear coaches of the early period SMJ train
Ref: smjsa52a
Real Photos
Close up showing the two rear coaches, both of six-wheel construction, and a GCR four-wheel bogie coach
SMJ six-wheel coaches, displaying the company's maroon livery, stand on the up line at Stratford station
Ref: smjsa280
Ian Allan Ltd
SMJ six-wheel coaches, displaying the company's crimson livery, stand on the up line at Stratford station

SMJ Goods brake van No 6, one of ten such vehicles known to be in service in January 1916
Ref: smjsa351
CRH Simpson
SMJ Goods brake van No 6, one of ten such vehicles known to be in service with the SMJ in January 1916
SMJ Box Van No 28, one of eighteen such vehicles known to be in service in January 1916
Ref: smjsa352
CRH Simpson
SMJ Box Van No 28, one of eighteen such vehicles known to be in service with the SMJ in January 1916
SMJ Cattle Wagon No 62, one of four such vehicles reported to be in service in January 1916
Ref: smjsa353
CRH Simpson
SMJ Cattle Wagon No 62, one of four such vehicles reported to be in service with the SMJ in January 1916
A former Midland Railway 40 foot Clerestory brake/third class vacuum braked coach sold in 1910 to for use on the SMJ
Ref: smjsa354
CRH Simpson
An ex- MR 40 foot Clerestory brake/third class vacuum braked coach sold in 1910 to for use on the SMJ
Passenger rated Horse boxes No 26, one of ten such vehicles known to be in service in January 1916
Ref: smjsa355
CRH Simpson
Passenger rated Horse boxes No 26, one of ten such vehicles known to be in service with the SMJ in January 1916

Passenger rated Horse boxes No 20, one of ten such vehicles known to be in service in January 1916
Ref: smjsa356
CRH Simpson
Passenger rated Horse boxes No 20, one of ten vehicles known to be in service with the SMJ in January 1916
SMJ No 39, a 15 ton six-wheel brake van built for the E&WJR by Harrison & Camm Ltd of Rotherham
Ref: smjsa357
CRH Simpson
SMJ No 39, a 15 ton six-wheel brake van built for the E&WJR by Harrison & Camm Ltd of Rotherham
SMJ Goods brake van No 31  one of ten such vehicles known to be in service in January 1916
Ref: smjsa358
CRH Simpson
SMJ Goods brake van No 31 one of ten such vehicles known to be in service with the SMJ in January 1916
A Stratford Midland Junction 4-plank open wagon carrying goods packed in barrels
Ref: smj_misc59
A Thompson
A Stratford Midland Junction 4-plank open wagon seen in a freight train carrying goods packed in barrels
An official photograph of a timber bolster wagon circa 1903-4 time which shows the EWJR carriage livery very well
Ref: smjsa409
S Dunkley
An official photograph of a timber bolster wagon circa 1903-4 time which shows the EWJR carriage livery very well

A Midland Railway Banana Van, of the type used on the Avonmouth to St Pancras trains routed over the SMJ Broom Junction to Ravenstone Wood line
Ref: smj_misc333
British Railways
A Midland Railway Banana Van, of the type used on the Avonmouth to St Pancras trains routed over the SMJ line
A Gauge 1 tinplate model of a Greaves Lime or Cement wagon in East and West Junction Railway livery
Ref: smjsa410
P Strange
A Gauge 1 tinplate model of a Greaves Lime or Cement wagon in East and West Junction Railway livery

Tables and drawings of E&WJR Locomotives and Rolling stock

A dimensional drawing showing the elevation and plan of a six-wheel SMJ Brake Third carriage
Ref: smj_misc319
W Simpson
A dimensional drawing showing the elevation and plan of a six-wheel SMJ Brake Third carriage for 20 people
A table providing a description of E&WJR locomotives' build & scrap dates, maker, wheel arrangement,  No, etc
Ref: smj_misc326
W Simpson
A table providing a description of E&WJR locomotives' build & scrap dates, maker, wheel arrangement, No, etc
A table providing a description of goods vehicles available in service on the SMJ in January 1916
Ref: smj_misc359
W Simpson
A table providing a description of goods vehicles available in service on the SMJ in January 1916
A table providing a description of the coaching stock available in service on the SMJ in January 1916
Ref: smj_misc360
W Simpson
A table providing a description of the coaching stock available in service on the SMJ in January 1916

The LMS Ro-Railer

Stratford upon Avon Transport Notes -Volume 02/04 by J R Jennings, SMJR line archivist.

The LMS “Ro-Railer” I have been researching and lecturing on the Stratford upon Avon and Midland Junction Railway for over forty years. It is incredible how many times I am asked about the 'Ro-Railer'. This vehicle only served in revenue service for a few weeks yet it has taken on almost mythical status and although it deserves a place in history, its main contribution to Stratford is that it put the station at Old Town and the LMS railway as an alternative route clearly in front of a much wider public than it had ever previously enjoyed. Not since the days of the “Harvard” special trains in the pre-Great War era did so many people crowd onto the 'other' Stratford station as on the morning of 23rd April 1932. I estimate that more photos were taken of the Ro-Railer (and certainly more survive) than of any other ex-SMJR line subject. If only the unique Fairlie engine had enjoyed similar status! This short volume has been edited over the years as new data has come to light. It draws together information that appears in many sources elsewhere.

The Stratford upon Avon and Midland Junction Railway and the LMS Railway that took it over in 1923 made various attempts over the years to offer a through connection between Stratford and London. The rival GWR route with a change at Leamington Spa was longer than either the Stratford - Marylebone or Stratford - Euston possibilities that existed using the SMJ route. In the early 1900s a through service was provided by a coach that was worked over the SMJ line before being attached to a Great Central Railway London service at Woodford. This involved the coach being 'trip worked' from Byfield to Woodford and back. Its progress over the SMJ line to Stratford was slow because it was attached to a normal all stations stopping train. The Railway 'grouping' of 1923 put the Great Central Railway in the LNER camp with the SMJ becoming part of the LMSR. This really ended any future cooperation on through coaches via Woodford. The 'gateway' from the SMJ line to London had always been via Woodford because when the GCR London extension was built the need to generate traffic was paramount and the layout at Woodford took account of interchange traffic with the SMJR. The LMS could direct traffic to its West Coast Main Line at either Blisworth or Roade. The connection at Roade had never been fully utilized even for freight but the interchange at Blisworth was one of the better used parts of the ex SMJ system and although passengers would need to walk through to the main p latforms a reasonable connection to the capital could be achieved. The authors of the vario us books on the SMJ have never effectively explored why the Roade connection was not developed for passenger through traffic. In mileage terms it was very attractive but the most plausible explanation is that the LMS (and LNWR before it) did not want to stop express trains at a relatively unimportant station to attach/detach through coaches of dubious commercial benefit to them. Some authors have suggested that the track layout at Roade dating from the 1840’s and the lack of a shunting engine at all times were also considerations.

During the 1920s competition from road transport was becoming a big problem for all of the railway companies and they explored ways of cutting costs and developing new traffic on loss making lines. The LMS were aware that Stratford upon Avon was an increasingly important destination with the attractions of the 'new' theatre and their own investment in the Welcombe Hotel. Ways of providing a passenger service of reasonable journey time were considered and it was decided to trial a new concept of vehicle that could run on both rail and road. If successful this would have great potential to win traffic for lightly used lines. In the case of the Stratford service it would be possible to convey passengers and their luggage directly to and from the Welcombe Hotel via the SMJ line as far as Blisworth where with just one change of train they would be conveyed directly to Euston. The journey time would be enhanced by the vehicle running non-stop from Blisworth to Stratford although the constraints of a difficult single track line often meant waits at Towcester and Kineton.

The LMS Ro-Railer UR7924 was ordered by the LMS carriage division at Wolverton in Feb 1931. The supplier Karrier Motors of Huddersfield was a surprise to some as they were running down their bus production having earned a poor reputation for reliability in the 1920's. The chassis was a standard Karrier Chaser powered by a 6 cylinder engine with a maximum rating of 120hp. The Chaser was the last serious bus design by Karrier. The body was built by Cravens to their B26C design and featured 14 front facing seats in the forward vestibule and 12 longitudinal seats in the rear smoking saloon. Luggage space was provided on the roof or by folding up some of the seats in the rear vestibule. It weighed 7tons 2cwt and was fitted with railway sanding gear, lamp irons and emergency drawgear for locomotive haulage. Loco haulage was limited to 20mph although apart from the presumed rescue on its demise there is no record of loco haulage taking place. The pneumatic road wheels and traditional flanged rail wheels were mounted on a manually set eccentric arrangement and could be switched from road to rail in under five minutes by one man whilst the vehicle stood over a sleepered crossing. The technical arrangements are dealt with fairly comprehensively in most of the books that have been published about the ex-SMJR line.

After delivery and acceptance at Wolverton it was put on trial on the Hemel Hemstead – Harpenden branch where it was photographed in late 1931 by H C Casserley. In an attempt to gain publicity the LMS decided to allocate this first experimental vehicle to the ex SMJ section and the service was launched at Stratford upon Avon on 23rd April 1932. This is an important day for the town as it is the birthday of William Shakespeare and there would be many influential people and pressmen around on the day. As previously mentioned the LMS had converted a mansion at Welcombe into a Hotel and the Ro-Railer was charged with conveying passengers directly to it without the need to transfer themselves or their luggage at the railway station. There was a minor skirmish with an omnibus company who held the local carriage license and objected to the LMS in effect providing a service on their territory although they did not offer a route from Stratford LMS t o the Welcombe hotel! This was resolved by the LMS agreeing to charge a flat rate fare of sixpence (6d) for any intermediate fare stage if passengers were picked up in the town. There were few takers.

The Ro-Railer suffered from the same problems as many early road bus conversions to rail in that it was too light for efficient rail adhesion particularly on a line like the ex SMJ which had the gradient profile of a switchback. It struggled to maintain progress uphill and was then driven hard on the downhill to compensate. (The author experienced a very similar vehicle still in use in Chile in 1993 and the ride qualities were not for the faint hearted!) The lack of effective suspension and springing meant that the hammer blow from rail joints and crossings was transmitted to both machinery and occupants. Early failure of some vital part was inevitable and after a few weeks of operation the Ro-Railer broke a front axle component whilst in service near Byfield. It was removed to Wolverton and never used again as a rail vehicle although the fact that its road registration was renewed for a number of years after suggests disposal for use as a road vehicle. The LMS did have plans to order more including goods/passenger convertible versions for branch line use. These plans were abandoned by virtue of a short minute at an LMS board meeting in late 1932.

In view of its novelty and the launch on 23rd April there is a wealth of photographic material of the vehicle. In addition to the railway coverage the odd shot of it on the streets of Stratford keeps coming to light as residents come forward with a photograph taken by a relative of this 'unusual vehicle' as the local paper had described it. Apart from Casserley's efforts not too many photos of it exist outside of the Stratford area or in any other SMJ l ine station. The launch of the service drew a large gathering of contemporary railway enthusiasts many of who can be seen in the photographs that have been well published over the years. Some cine films of the vehicle have survived and at least one copy is held in the archive collection administered by Rob Foxon of Leicester.

One Ro-Railer story that has recently surfaced was that it was alleged to have been sent out to substitute for an unavailable loco and coach on the Stratford - Broom Junction scheduled service one day. The turntable at Broom was unavailable (the East to West connection forming a triangle was 10 years in the future) so the Ro-Railer returned backwards!

The Ro-Railer being presented by Lord Stamp

A view of the Ro-Railer at Stratford on Avon's up platform during one of the tests held during April 1932
Ref: smjsa30
The Shakespeare Trust
A view of the Ro-Railer at Stratford on Avon's up platform during one of the tests held during April 1932
The Ro-Railer reverses off the railway on to road using the special ramp which lay adjacent to the cattle dock
Ref: smjsa47
Anon
The Ro-Railer reverses off the railway on to road using the special ramp which lay adjacent to the cattle dock
The Ro-Railer is seen reversing on to the ramp where it can lower its road wheels to proceed by road
Ref: smjsa66
Lens of Sutton
The Ro-Railer is seen reversing on to the ramp where it can lower its road wheels to proceed by road
Close up showing the remains of the station's cattle dock and some of the goods yard buildings
Ref: smjsa307
JR Jennings
The Ro-Railer at Stratford goods yard after made ready for to travel by road to the Welcombe Hotel
Another view of the Ro-Railer at Stratford undergoing its wheels being changed from rail to road use
Ref: smjsa308
JR Jennings
Another view of the Ro-Railer at Stratford undergoing its wheels being changed from rail to road use

The Ro-Railer being tested on road and rail

The Ro-Railer seen here with a full complement of passengers which suggests its on test
Ref: smjsa306
British Railways
The Ro-Railer seen here with a full complement of passengers which suggests its on test
The Ro- Railer is seen travelling 'wrong' road after leaving the single section from Fenny Compton
Ref: smjsa123
AT Locke/KRM
The Ro- Railer is seen travelling 'wrong' road after leaving the single section from Fenny Compton
The Ro-Railer is standing at the up platform whilst ex-MR 4-4-0 No 556 stands on the middle road
Ref: smjsa104
Lens of Sutton
The Ro-Railer is standing at the up platform whilst ex-MR 4-4-0 No 556 stands on the middle road
The Ro-Railer undergoing fare-paying trials on the route between Blisworth, Stratford upon Avon and the Welcombe Hotel
Ref: smjsa311
RC Riley
The Ro-Railer undergoing fare-paying trials on the route between Blisworth and Stratford upon Avon
Passengers prepare to board the Ro-Railer during one of its fare-paying tests in April 1932
Ref: smjsa281
A Jordan
Passengers prepare to board the Ro-Railer during one of its fare-paying tests in April 1932

A member of the LMS' staff checks the Ro-Railer's temporary buffing heads and a draw hook
Ref: smjsa310
A Locke
A member of the LMS' staff checks the Ro-Railer's temporary buffing heads and a draw hook
The Ro-Railer about to leave Stratford upon Avon goods yard for the Welcombe Hotel in April 1932
Ref: smjsa313
JR Jennings
The Ro-Railer about to leave Stratford upon Avon goods yard for the Welcombe Hotel in April 1932
View of the Ro-Railer passing through Stratford on Avon and the old Shakespeare Theatre on its way to the station
Ref: smjsa121
AT Locke
View of the Ro-Railer passing through Stratford on Avon and the old Shakespeare Theatre on its way to the station
Welcombe Hotel guests and their luggage are about to board the Ro-Railer for Blisworth via Stratford
Ref: smjsa312
JR Jennings
Welcombe Hotel guests and their luggage are about to board the Ro-Railer for Blisworth via Stratford

The Ro-Railer's wheel change and technical information

Close up showing the remains of the station's cattle dock and some of the goods yard buildings
Ref: smj_misc362
British Railways
The Karrier Ro-Railer photographed at the factory of Cravens after the fitting of the bodywork in 1931
Changing the wheels configuration of the Ro-Railer from travelling on the road to travelling on the rails
Ref: smjsa122
AT Locke/KRM
Changing the wheels configuration of the Ro-Railer from travelling on the road to travelling on the rails
The driver uses a lever to raise the road wheel on the eccentric, the man on the right holds one of the holding pins
Ref: smj_misc315
British Railways
The driver uses a lever to raise the road wheel, the man on the right holds one of the holding pins
The road wheel has now been raised to work on the rail with both holding pins located above the hub
Ref: smj_misc314
British Railways
The road wheel has now been raised to work on the rail with both holding pins located above the hub
View of the Ro-Railer's later modified wheel lift system with the road wheel in the raised position
Ref: smj_misc305
British Railways
View of the Ro-Railer's later modified wheel lift system with the road wheel in the raised position

Close up showing the remains of the station's cattle dock and some of the goods yard buildings
Ref: smj_misc309
British Railways
An interior view of the forward facing section of 14 seats, the rear section being a smoking salon
Table providing the technical specification of the Karrier Ro-Railer designed to meet the requirements of the LMS
Ref: smj_misc304
W Simpson
The technical specification of the Karrier Ro-Railer designed to meet the requirements of the LMS

Stratford on Avon Station (173) Stratford on Avon Shed (73) SMJ Locomotives and Rolling Stock (61)